Moving to Malta offers trail-blazing expats a unique selection of tasty food and drink experiences.

From smart, luxurious bursts of intellectualism with your cuisine, to a hint of adventure with every bite, Malta’s culinary options are diverse.

Here are five flavorful and fun things to do in Malta:

1. Dinner in the Sky — Malta

Dinner in the skyOn warm summer evenings in Malta, you may see a magenta-colored light hovering over the Maltese skyline. While it may not be an extraterrestrial object, this electric glow is certainly out of this world.

Dinner in the Sky is a unique Maltese dining experience being held 40 meters above the Earth’s surface. Every night, a rectangular platform with cushioned chairs surrounding a kitchen and bar is hoisted into the air. Once aloft, diners can enjoy panoramic views of Malta.

A maximum of 22 guests are seat-belted into Dinner in the Sky at any one time. There are two seatings, or “flights,” every evening at 7:00 and 9:30. The 90-minute event is filled with gourmet foods and abundant wine.

“We have a lot of birthdays, anniversaries, wedding proposals, honeymooners, staff parties, demonstrations, and other events,” says Jean Paul Gauci, Managing Director of Dinner in the Sky — Malta. “We normally change location yearly.”

Launched in 2016, Dinner in the Sky has held airborne events in several locations, including the Grand Harbour, Golden Bay, and Manoel Island. The company has operations in over 40 countries.

Guests must be over 130 centimeters and should keep their belongings secure. If nature calls, the platform can return to Earth in less than 60 seconds.

Dinner in the Sky runs from May until September and may not fly if the weather is unfavorable. However, when it does, it might be worth pursuing this delicious, exhilarating experience.

2. The Cliffs Interpretation Centre

The Cliffs Interpretation CentreThe Dingli Cliffs on Malta’s western edge are a stunning example of the island’s geology. This serrated edge of limestone cuts out of the Mediterranean and rises roughly 200 meters above sea level, offering visitors breathtaking views, golden sunsets, and a unique culinary experience.

The mission of The Cliffs Interpretation Centre in Dingli is to preserve and promote the natural assets of Malta’s largest conservation area. Over 1,000 wild plants can be found in the Maltese countryside, offering a diversity of novel flavors.

“Local plants that are seasonally produced at the kitchen of The Cliffs include borage, stinging nettles, wild asparagus, wild fennel, saffron, carob, quince, azalore, pomegranate, and capers,” says Mario Muscat, Director of The Cliffs Interpretation Centre. “The menu is unique.”

Sustainability lies at the heart of the Interpretation Centre’s philosophy. By raising awareness of the region’s incredible culinary offerings, The Cliffs hope to inform and inspire visitors to protect Malta’s green space.

“Using wild edible plants in cooking is still alive in Dingli, though it is slowly fading away,” says Mario. “Recording, preserving, and infusing such a knowledge system is fundamental.”

The Cliffs help to stimulate sustainable economic development by buying local produce within a one-kilometer radius.

“Cheeselets are provided by the only local shepherd roaming Dingli Cliffs with his livestock,” says Mario. “First preference is given to agricultural produce available in the area according to the season.”

The Cliffs also offer informative tours of the Dingli area on a “pay-what-you-feel-it’s-worth” basis. Tours start with an audiovisual display, followed by a walk featuring local ecology, history, and culture. Offered year-round, tours can be arranged via their website.

3. Luxury Yachting Along Malta’s Coastline

Luxury Yachting Along Malta’s CoastlineMalta’s Grand Harbour is brimming with history. For centuries, ships have been sailing in and out of this jagged inlet of water.

If you listen carefully, you might even hear echoes of its past. Imagine the cheers erupting from the crowds lining the Grand Harbour in 1942 when the SS Ohio barely entered port carrying relief supplies to the besieged island.

Look closely and you may be able to visualize the swashbuckling Knights of St. John as they defend their island against all odds in the Great Siege of 1565.

The Grand Harbour is the gateway to a coastline filled with incredible history and stunning beauty, and yachting offers a great way to explore it. It also offers a memorable opportunity to dine on Maltese cuisine.

If you charter a luxury yacht, sample Malta’s lighter foods while sailing past imposing watchtowers and forts built by the Knights.

Pack a picnic of gourmet gifts including cheeselets from Gozo called Ġbejna, crispy Maltese bread, and a premium bottle of Maltese wine.

Although, if you’re a fan of Rolex watches and are planning on being out on the water in September or October, take note of the dates for the Rolex Middle Sea Race.

This annual event has been taking cruisers out of Malta’s Grand Harbour on a multi-day sail around Sicily for 50 years. Ocean-going traffic around Malta can be busy during this time.

4. Champagne at the Casa Rocca Piccola

Casa Rocca PiccolaWine tasting in Malta can be a premium affair. However, sipping champagne in a 16th-century palace in the capital is decidedly exclusive.

Casa Rocca Piccola on Republic Street in Valletta is the home of the de Piro family — descendants of Maltese nobility. This elegant palace is still lived-in, and the Friday evening champagne tours are often given by Marquis de Piro himself.

From ornate dining and living rooms, to a subterranean World War II bomb shelter carved out of limestone, there is plenty to see.

A parrot even lives onsite.

Champagne tours should be arranged via the palace website and offer a nice prelude to a Friday night on the town.

5. Malta’s Fanciful Fruit Festivals

Fruit Festival MaltaMingle with the Maltese at one of the islands’ many fruit festivals, which occur throughout the year during harvest time.

Citrus Festival

Held annually at the San Anton Palace in the town of Attard, the Citrus Festival is a chance to taste fresh oranges and lemons from Malta’s largest citrus garden.

Step out into the relative warmth of a Maltese January and try delicious sweet treats, jams, and juice made from local citrus. Proceeds go to local charities.

The San Anton Palace is the official residence of the President of Malta, so don’t be surprised if you brush shoulders with her security detail or find yourself chatting about citrus with the President herself.

Strawberry Festival

If you love fresh strawberries, then the Strawberry Festival, or Festa Frawli in Maltese, is a must-do.

Held in April near the UNESCO-protected Ta’ Ħaġrat Temples in Mġarr, the strawberry festival is a chance to feast on incredible fruit delicacies. From a strawberry-spin on the traditional Maltese pastizzi, to strawberry cannoli and cheesecake, this festival is a smorgasbord of red berry magic.

Fig Festival

Every summer, just a few blocks from the 5,000-year-old Ġgantija Temples on Gozo, a festival is held celebrating the fabulous fig.

The sound of live music blends with the crunch of red and purple fig seeds to form a tasty and unique activity.

The event only lasts a weekend, so plan early for this fig-tastic festival.

Olive Festival

As summer gives way to autumn, olive harvests commence around the islands. To celebrate the bounty, an olive festival is held each September in the town of Żejtun.

Persuade your palate with rich, freshly pressed olive oil poured over crispy Maltese bread. Sample plump olives of every variety together with a cold glass of Maltese beer.

Travel back in time as you watch reenactments from Malta’s diverse history. Or explore the festival’s vibrant arts and crafts displays.

Arrive early for the best treats and seats since this festival is extremely popular.

Moving to Malta

Enjoying all of the island’s tasty things to do is easier when you’re living in Malta.

With so many events year-round, you may want to considering moving to the islands to ensure you don’t miss out.