Malta offers much in the way of studying, with free undergraduate courses in English-language classrooms for EU members, and a stellar reputation in medicine and economics. If you decide to head to this island in the Mediterranean for your education, we have made it easy by running through student accommodation options. Whether it’s student residences, host family stays or hotels, we offer our top tips.

The Basics

Before settling on your new student life in Malta, familiarise yourself with some of the basics. A visa is required despite Malta’s Schengen Area agreement if you are planning to stay for more than three months. This won’t be a problem if you’re opting for a short course, but longer registration requires a residence document and, concurrently, longer leases when looking for accommodation. Once you know the term requirements it will be easier to choose your student accommodation.

Irrespective of which accommodation you choose, you should adhere to the following basic rules:

  • Understand and read through the regulations of your accommodation.
  • Make sure not to disturb other residents, both students and non-students.
  • Maintain a tidy and clean room.
  • Prevent excessive use of energy and water. In particular, it is important not the leave your taps needlessly running as Malta’s water supply is produced through reverse osmosis, necessitating high volumes of electricity consumption.
  • Turn off all lights, fans, heaters and air conditions when they are not in use.
  • Notify your accommodation coordinator at your university if difficulties arise.

Choices of Student Accommodation:

1. Host Families

Living with a host family offers the most authentic integrative experience, where you can truly experience a local culture day-to-day. Nevertheless, you are expected — as a guest — to participate with and respect your host family. Often, clear and succinct communication is the best component of a successful stay. Rules are understandably hard to predict, so pay attention on arrival to any requests from your host family and jot down their expectations on paper. It is best to follow these following simple rules:

  • Consider the routines and habits of your host family and don’t interfere with their schedule. Most families work and will not appreciate a disruptive night!
  • Respect any curfews given, particular if on a junior course.
  • Keep you Maltese hosts informed of your daily plans and ask permission before inviting guests over.
  • Inform your family or programme early for any dietary requirements (or preferences).
  • If you opt to eat out or stay out late, notify your hosts know in advance.
  • Ask permission before using the kitchen or electrical appliances, unless told otherwise. This also goes for helping yourself to food without permission!
  • Be considerate in your use of the bathroom and keep your bedroom tidy.

2. Hotels

Hotels are a great option for short courses and more independently minded, older or travelling students. For instance, Hotel Kappara is officially used by the University of Malta. Be sure to follow all hotel rules to avoid any difficulties.

3. Student Residences

One of the more popular options, a student residence offers independence and integration with an oftentimes vibrant international student community. Given that such accommodation is located in residential areas, it is important to follow these tips:

  • Follow rules, keep property tidy and be careful not to cause damage – this will dwindle your deposit.
  • Avoid making noise at night or in the early morning. This is especially important when leaving and returning to your room.
  • Respect any differences in national customs you may meet.
  • Treat your neighbours cordially and do not block any roads or driveways.

With these tips in mind, you will be off to a head start in Malta when choosing accommodation.